ottabenga:

Why can’t you just say I did good? Come on. Why can’t you say it?

Posted on Oct 20

dutchster:

i have such a busy schedule. i may have to cut out “studying” to make room for “crying over tv shows” and “4 hour nap”

Posted on Oct 20
Posted on Oct 20
Posted on Oct 20

priveting:

by I. Trairatanobhas

Posted on Oct 20
Posted on Oct 20

Taylor Swift on Emma Watson’s UN speech and (last 2 gifs) on not “acting up” like Miley Cyrus and Britney Spears (x)

priveting:

(by Eera Photography)

Posted on Oct 20

oknope:

it’s only monday and i’m about 98% done with this week

Posted on Oct 20

microaggressions:

My husband and I both have doctoral degrees; he earned one degree and I earned two. But written correspondence from friends, family, and community organizations is almost invariably addressed to “Dr. and Mrs.”

Posted on Oct 20

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

Posted on Oct 20

okadas:

【予約販売】目玉焼き 浴衣セット♀(レディース)

39,960円

Posted on Oct 20

A stunning high res photo of Saturn’s Moon Enceladus

Posted on Oct 20

mylifeinslut:

sktagg23:

sktagg23:

But let’s talk about Jamie Brewer.

She’s awesome.

Jamie Brewer made her television debut on American Horror Story. Prior to her transition to acting on camera she was a theatrical actress. She has not left the stage, however, and still continues her training through theater and through improvisation at 'The Groundlings Theatre and School' .

Being an individual with Down Syndrome Jamie has made it a point to be active in the Down Syndrome community. Jamie was the youngest to ever be elected President of the ARC of Fort Bend Chapter. From there, she was appointed to the State of Texas ARC Board, then elected to the Executive Board as Treasurer. Jamie was then asked to serve on the ARC Governmental Affairs Committee for the State of Texas. She spoke with Senators at the Texas State Capitol to persuade them to pass the law for Texas to abolish using the “R” word from state legislation, and regarding the needs of people with disabilities in Texas. Texas now uses “Intellectual Developmental Disability” in their legislation. 1

Brewer is involved with a several non-profit organizations, including DSALA, DSiAM, BTAP, National Down Syndrome Congress, American Association of People with Disabilities of the United States, and Civitan International.

QUEEN.

The True Supreme, IMHO

Posted on Oct 20
Realize that anyone who tries to put you down about your appearance is assuming that it is your job to please them visually. Once you realize that it isn’t your job to be visually pleasing to anyone, ever, it becomes very hard for anyone to make you feel bad about yourself.
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Skeptifem (via grrrlstudies)

AFUCKINGMEN.

(via naamahdarling)

Posted on Oct 20